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plasmatics:

Water Cathedral by Gabriel de Leon | (Website)
blunthought:


Bobby Hutton.
He joined the Black Panther Party at the age of 16, in 1966. On April 6th, 1968, he was traveling in a car with a few other Black Panther members, when they were ambushed by the Oakland police. They ran for cover in a building nearby. When the police finally threw tear gas into the building, Hutton stripped down to his underwear so that the police would know he was unarmed and he walked out.
The police shot him 12 times. At the age of 17, Bobby Hutton was murdered by the police.

Anonymous said: How is life truly in the DPRK? Juche is by all means revisionist but still ideologically socialist so I don't really understand or believe these narratives of portraying the DPRK as a monster or most of what is said by these supposed fugitives of 'concentration camps'.

friendshipandlabor:

I need to first point out that I’m highly skeptical of anything which would claim to be able to illustrate “how life is truly in the DPRK”, because of how hard it would be to actually get accurate source material for such a large study. With that said, I’m pretty much in the same boat as you. This article by marxism-leninism-maoism does a great job showing how ridiculous and completely divorced from reality all the Western propaganda against North Korea really is. You can pretty much say anything you want about them and get away with it, even in journalism. IIRC this article does a pretty good job with actually examining how the DPRK functions. 

me
owning-my-truth:

aka14kgold:

It IS illegal.
So’s murder and hate crimes, and they’ll get away with all of it.

Don’t even need armed vigilantes wearing hoods like the KKK when you got the Ferguson PD with their shades and no name tags. God bless AmeriKKKa. 
free-parking:

Mark Rothko, Blue and Grey, 1962, oil on canvas
“I’m not an abstractionist… I’m not interested in relationships of color or forms… I’m interested only in expressing basic human emotions—tragedy, ecstasy, doom and so on… The people who weep before my pictures are having the same religious experience I had when I painted them.”—Mark Rothko, 1956